Debt Statute of Limitations

Many people do not know there is a statute of limitations on debt. The debt statute of limitations refers to the amount of time after which creditors can no longer sue you to collect a debt. If a debt collector threatens to sue you over a debt that is beyond the state statute of limitations, they are in violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you are being harassed by a debt collector and think your fair debt rights are being violated, click here for a FREE* Fair Debt Case Review or call toll free 888-595-9111 to request a free case review. There is no charge for the case review and the services of a fair debt lawyer or fair credit attorney may be available to you at little or no cost.

State statutes of limitation on debt collection apply to open ended contracts such as credit cards and store credit accounts and contracts for sale under the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). Also covered under most State’s statutes of limitation are oral agreements, promissory notes, written contracts, loans, mortgages and car payments as well as foreign and domestic judgments. Under the right circumstances the debt statute of limitations can be renewed for just about any type of debt.

Credit Statute of Limitations on Credit Reporting

zombie debt junk debt high yield debtMany people confuse the debt statute of limitations with the statute of limitations on credit reporting. The credit statute of limitations is the maximum amount of time given to credit bureaus to old debt on your credit report. For the majority of accounts, it is seven years from the date of delinquency though bankruptcies and tax liens can be reported for longer. The credit statute of limitations is dictated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act and does not influence the state statute of limitations for debt collection.

Click here to view a full list each state’s debt statutes of limitation (SOL).

Debt Statute of Limitations

Numbers on this chart indicate years.

State
Oral
Agreements
Written
Contracts
Promissory
Notes
Open
Accounts
Alabama
6
6
6
3
Alaska
6
6
6
6
Arizona
3
6
5
3
Arkansas
3
5
6
3
California
2
4
4
4
Colorado
6
6
6
6
Connecticut
3
6
6
6
Delaware
3
3
6
3
D.C.
3
3
3
3
Florida
4
5
5
4
Georgia
4
6
6
4
Hawaii
6
6
6
6
Idaho
4
5
10
4
Illinois
5
10
6
5
Indiana
6
10
10
6
Iowa
5
10
5
5
Kansas
3
5
5
3
Kentucky
5
15
15
5
Louisiana
10
10
10
3
Maine
6
6
6
6
Maryland
3
3
6
3
Massachusetts
6
6
6
6
Michigan
6
6
6
6
Minnesota
6
6
6
6
Mississippi
3
3
3
3
Missouri
5
10
10
5
Montana
5
8
8
5
Nebraska
4
5
6
4
Nevada
4
6
3
4
New Hampshire
3
3
6
3
New Jersey
6
6
6
6
New Mexico
4
6
6
4
New York
6
6
6
6
North Carolina
3
3
5
3
North Dakota
6
6
6
6
Ohio
6
15
15
?
Oklahoma
3
5
5
3
Oregon
6
6
6
6
Pennsylvania
4
6
4
6
Rhode Island
15
15
10
10
South Carolina
10
10
3
3
South Dakota
6
6
6
6
Tennessee
6
6
6
6
Texas
4
4
4
4
Utah
4
6
6
4
Vermont
6
6
5
6
Virginia
3
5
6
3
Washington
3
6
6
3
West Virginia
5
10
6
5
Wisconsin
6
6
10
6
Wyoming
8
10
10
8

8 comments

  1. Does the Statute of Limitations apply to a Military Star Card (offered by Army Air Force Exchange Service)? Opened in 1994 and last used in 2006?

    • The Military Star Card is a government as such it isn’t handled the same as traditional credit cards. For example the government can garnish military pension for none payment. If this account is causing you other financial trouble, we may be able to help you re-prioritize your other debts through debt settlement, and in the process, we can enforce your other consumer credit and debt rights. Call us at 888-595-9111 and get a free case review, there is no obligation and it sounds like you can use the help!

  2. Hi, I am searching for good answers to a bad check debt I have that is 5 years old. The account haz been sold off about 2 to 3 times because I see different companies calling me on the same account. In short, I payed a debt for my father for a construction business he had to cover emergency needs for a clients building, the client failed to pay my father even through legal court, I never actually got the money, therefore left with the debt. The account is 5 years old, the company with the claim is harassing me even though I threw the statute of limitations of California on them where the checks originally written. I need to know what all this means.

    Let me know

  3. I recieved a call saying i owed on fines frim 1996 and that it was now up to 9000 dollars is that legal? I have been in the same area all this time and am ashamed but paid alot of fines in 2003, so why now?

    • Generally speaking only consumer debts are covered by the FDCPA and traffic violations or government fines are not a “consumer debt.” But often, you can “borrow from Peter to pay Paul” and you may benefit from exploring debt settlement. Call us at 888-595-9111 and let’s evaluate your financial situation and see if your debts can be re-prioritized. And if you are having other issues that we didn’t catch from your comment, call us for a free, no obligation case review.

  4. In NC I have been making payment for 10 years to the hospital now they sold my debt and I am getting calls saying I have to pay $300 per month and nothing less. I can;t afford it I have 3 children. I never missed a payment to the hospital in 10 years.
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    • Consumers do have rights under the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act (FDCPA) Take advantage of this site’s FREE, no obligation case review and let’s figure out how to get you some real help, you may be entitled to $1,000 or more! Make the collector follow the law or pay you, call us at 888-595-9111 and we’ll get you taken care of.

  5. Hi, i was leaving in michiga untill 2000. i left 10000 debt on a credit card And i moved back to my country. 2 years ago i moved back to usa but inFlorida. They send me a letter for a settlment. Now the debt is over 14 years, did the statute of limitation jas expired? Should i contact them and what i should tell?

    Thank you in advance

    • The Statute of Limitations on debt is a rule that sets a time limit within which a creditor may sue you for payment of a debt. The length of time varies from state to state. If a debt collector threatens to sue you over a debt that is beyond the state statute of limitations, they are in violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. When a statute of limitation expires, it does not mean that the debt goes away, it only means you can use it as a defense to stop collectors from collecting thru the court system. Collectors can still try to collect thru other methods. Under the right circumstances the debt statute of limitations can be renewed for just about any type of debt. If you are being contacted by a debt collector and think your fair debt rights are being violated, Fair Debt Case Review or call toll free 888-595-9111 to request a free case review.

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