Debt Statute of Limitations

Many people do not know there is a statute of limitations on debt. The debt statute of limitations refers to the amount of time after which creditors can no longer sue you to collect a debt. If a debt collector threatens to sue you over a debt that is beyond the state statute of limitations, they are in violation of the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act. If you are being harassed by a debt collector and think your fair debt rights are being violated, click here for a FREE* Fair Debt Case Review or call toll free 888-595-9111 to request a free case review. There is no charge for the case review and the services of a fair debt lawyer or fair credit attorney may be available to you at little or no cost.

State statutes of limitation on debt collection apply to open ended contracts such as credit cards and store credit accounts and contracts for sale under the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC). Also covered under most State’s statutes of limitation are oral agreements, promissory notes, written contracts, loans, mortgages and car payments as well as foreign and domestic judgments. Under the right circumstances the debt statute of limitations can be renewed for just about any type of debt.

Credit Statute of Limitations on Credit Reporting

zombie debt junk debt high yield debtMany people confuse the debt statute of limitations with the statute of limitations on credit reporting. The credit statute of limitations is the maximum amount of time given to credit bureaus to old debt on your credit report. For the majority of accounts, it is seven years from the date of delinquency though bankruptcies and tax liens can be reported for longer. The credit statute of limitations is dictated by the Fair Credit Reporting Act and does not influence the state statute of limitations for debt collection.

Click here to view a full list each state’s debt statutes of limitation (SOL).

Debt Statute of Limitations

Numbers on this chart indicate years.

State
Oral
Agreements
Written
Contracts
Promissory
Notes
Open
Accounts
Alabama Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
3
Alaska Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Arizona Statute of Limitations
3
6
5
3
Arkansas Statute of Limitations
3
5
6
3
California Statute of Limitations
2
4
4
4
Colorado Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Connecticut Statute of Limitations
3
6
6
6
Delaware Statute of Limitations
3
3
6
3
D.C. Statute of Limitations
3
3
3
3
Florida Statute of Limitations
4
5
5
4
Georgia Statute of Limitations
4
6
6
4
Hawaii Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Idaho Statute of Limitations
4
5
10
4
Illinois Statute of Limitations
5
10
6
5
Indiana Statute of Limitations
6
10
10
6
Iowa Statute of Limitations
5
10
5
5
Kansas Statute of Limitations
3
5
5
3
Kentucky Statute of Limitations
5
15
15
5
Louisiana Statute of Limitations
10
10
10
3
Maine Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Maryland Statute of Limitations
3
3
6
3
Massachusetts Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Michigan Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Minnesota Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Mississippi Statute of Limitations
3
3
3
3
Missouri Statute of Limitations
5
10
10
5
Montana Statute of Limitations
5
8
8
5
Nebraska Statute of Limitations
4
5
6
4
Nevada Statute of Limitations
4
6
3
4
New Hampshire Statute of Limitations
3
3
6
3
New Jersey Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
New Mexico Statute of Limitations
4
6
6
4
New York Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
North Carolina Statute of Limitations
3
3
5
3
North Dakota Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Ohio Statute of Limitations
6
15
15
?
Oklahoma Statute of Limitations
3
5
5
3
Oregon Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Pennsylvania Statute of Limitations
4
6
4
6
Rhode Island Statute of Limitations
15
15
10
10
South Carolina Statute of Limitations
10
10
3
3
South Dakota Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Tennessee Statute of Limitations
6
6
6
6
Texas Statute of Limitations
4
4
4
4
Utah Statute of Limitations
4
6
6
4
Vermont Statute of Limitations
6
6
5
6
Virginia Statute of Limitations
3
5
6
3
Washington Statute of Limitations
3
6
6
3
West Virginia Statute of Limitations
5
10
6
5
Wisconsin Statute of Limitations
6
6
10
6
Wyoming Statute of Limitations
8
10
10
8
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Comments

  1. miguel says

    Hi, I am searching for good answers to a bad check debt I have that is 5 years old. The account haz been sold off about 2 to 3 times because I see different companies calling me on the same account. In short, I payed a debt for my father for a construction business he had to cover emergency needs for a clients building, the client failed to pay my father even through legal court, I never actually got the money, therefore left with the debt. The account is 5 years old, the company with the claim is harassing me even though I threw the statute of limitations of California on them where the checks originally written. I need to know what all this means.

    Let me know

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